PES website


CALL FOR PAPERS
74th Annual Meeting 2018

The 74th Annual Meeting of the Philosophy of Education Society (PES) will take place from March 22-26, 2018 in Chicago, Illinois, at the Palmer House Hilton: http://www.palmerhousehiltonhotel.com/

The Program Committee invites papers to be submitted for presentation at the Annual Meeting and for subsequent publication in the PES yearbook, Philosophy of Education 2018.  The Committee also invites proposals for: (1) alternative sessions; and (2) work-in-progress sessions designed to bring participants together to collaborate on developing ideas not yet ready for the regular paper submission process.  Papers and proposals that address the conference theme are specifically encouraged, but all submissions will be considered on an equal basis.

PES 2018 THEME: Education as Formation

In J.M Coetzee’s recent novel, The Schooldays of Jesus, a seven-year old child, Davíd, is delighted to discover upon his return to the Academy of Dance that the school’s pet lamb, Jeremiah, has “grown small” (Coetzee, 2016, p. 238).  David’s parental-figure, Simón, explains what has really happened:

No one in this world grows small, Davíd.   If he has turned small, it is not because Aloysha hasn’t been feeding him, it is because he is not the real Jeremiah.  He is a new Jeremiah who has taken the place of the old Jeremiah because the old Jeremiah has grown up and turned into a sheep.  People find young Jeremiahs endearing, but not old Jeremiahs.  No one wants to cuddle old Jeremiahs.  That is their misfortune (Coetzee, 2016, p. 238).

Here, Simón sums up the fate of all animals: as we age we grow and our growth makes us less adorable and charming.  In the case of human beings, however, aging and growth are accompanied by maturation and wisdom.  With the passage of time comes experience, perspective and, ideally, wisdom.  Life effectively teaches us how to live.  Thus, humans desire to grow up because maturity and wisdom are marks of improved judgment, autonomous self-determination, and the full realization of our humanity.

It is tempting to subordinate youth to maturity, that is, to conceive of the present as a mere preparation for the future.  Yet, as John Dewey demonstrates, the only adequate preparation for the future is to live fully in the present.  Generally speaking, children live in the present more than adults do.  Such an appreciation of childhood, however, can tempt us to devalue maturity: youth is associated with vitality, naiveté and idealism, whereas maturity is associated with lethargy, resignation, and cynicism.  Ultimately, the relation between youth and maturity is more complex; youth and maturity co-exist in the lives of all evolving individuals.  Most of our experiences must be lived before we can understand them.  Given that we can only know retrospectively how current experiences will live on in future ones, we can only discover who we truly are by reflecting on, and seeking to recognize ourselves in, our youthful searching.   We are formed by experiences, and we give form to ourselves through memory, understanding and narrative.

Although the social sciences dominate our understanding of human maturation, philosophy has much to contribute.  For example, philosophers question developmental models proposed by psychologists; they illuminate the problematic process of having to make significant life choices on behalf of one’s future, transformed, self; they ask how it is possible to educate for a more equitable and just society when the educators and educational institutions themselves are a part of the very society that they seek to reform; and they propose their own visions of formation.  Moreover, a philosophical examination of the conceptual link between formation and education has compelling implications for our understanding of and engagement in parenting, teaching, coaching, mentoring, and care-giving.  Accordingly, the Program Committee calls for papers and alternative session proposals for the 2018 PES annual conference that address all aspects of the theme of education as formation.  These include, but are not limited to:

  • Moral perfectionism

  • Formative justice

  • Bildung, Bildungsroman, and  the “coming of age” film

  • Existential, progressive and/or liberal education

  • Democracy and citizenship education

  • Critical theory and critical pedagogies

  • Potentiality, character, growing up, maturity, cultivation, transformation, and/or upbringing

  • Metaphors for human formation such as growing up, circles, narrative, and/or journey

  • Repetition, routine, regimentation, ritual, habit, practice, and training

  • Philosophical biography and/or autobiography

  • Philosophy of/as the art of living

  • Philosophies of childhood, aging, parenting, and/or intergenerational relationships

  • Philosophies founded upon concepts of natality, fate, and/or mortality

  • Psychoanalytic concepts of remembering, regression, irony, mourning, and melancholia

Submissions do not have to address the theme explicitly.  We also encourage submissions that attend to gaps within the field, and/or propose novel ways of thinking about perennial educational concerns.  All papers will go through a formal review process overseen by the program committee.  Papers may be deemed unacceptable on grounds of quality, but they will not be automatically excluded because they do not address the conference theme.

SUBMITTING PAPERS TO THE CONFERENCE

The Program Committee will review only submissions made in accordance with the instructions below. Papers reviewed and accepted by the Program Committee, and invited responses to them, will be published online in the society’s annual yearbook, Philosophy of Education 2018. Past issues can be viewed here:  http://ojs.ed.uiuc.edu/index.php/pes

Program Committee members: Kal Alston, Jason C. Blokhuis, Bob Davis, Kevin Gary, Tal Gilead, David T. Hansen, Chris Higgins, Mark Jonas, Duck-Joo Kwak, Natasha Levinson, Stephanie Mackler, Jennifer Morton, Naoko Saito, Paul Standish, Susan Verducci, David Waddington, Rachel Wahl, Quentin Wheeler-Bell and Douglas Yacek. (Thanks in advance to these colleagues for their service to the Society.) Graduate Assistant: Sara Hardman, Teachers College, Columbia University.

Deadline: Papers and proposals must be submitted electronically to  pes2018submissions@gmail.com no later than November 1, 2017.

Submission instructions appear below:

Submission Formats

Paper Submissions: Papers may not exceed 4,500 words, including footnotes, and must be written in proper PES form (see the  Style Guide). The 4,500-word limit will be strictly enforced. Papers that modestly exceed the 4,500-word limit will be subject to editing. Papers that exceed this limit excessively will be subject to rejection without review or to not being published in the PES yearbook.

Multiple reviewers will review papers blindly. Final decisions on manuscripts rest with the Program Chair. Criteria for review include quality of argument, links to philosophical and philosophy of education literature and to education policy and practice, quality of expression, and significance of the contribution. Please make sure that references to your name, institutional affiliation, or work (e.g., “As I have argued on many occasions…”) are omitted from the paper, including the notes. Your identifying information will not be available to reviewers.

Alternative Presentation Submissions: Proposals may not exceed 1,000 words, including references. If the session being proposed involves multiple presenters, please specify the contribution of each presenter.

Alternative presentation proposals take two general forms:

Alternative Sessions: Examples include roundtables, author meets critics panels, performances, interviews, and panel conversations on issues. Criteria for review include originality and clarity of motivating question or idea, potential interaction with session attendees, and relevance/ importance to educational philosophy and educational policy and practice. Alternative sessions may be scheduled concurrently with paper sessions or in separate time slots.

Work-in-Progress Sessions: These sessions will group scholars with work-in-progress in an informal collaborative setting. Proposals should detail the question or claim being investigated, relevant sources/ resources, likely direction, and mode(s) of analysis. Criteria for review include clarity and significance of the question/ claim, suitability of sources/ resources, suitability of mode(s) of analysis, and potential for thinking anew about issues in the field of educational philosophy.

Submission Process: Submit papers or proposals as a Word attachment to pes2018submissions@gmail.com  by November 1, 2017. In the body of your e-mail, please provide the following contact information:

  • Name
  • Institutional Affiliation
  • Email address
  • Phone number
  • Mailing address

Submissions will be accepted beginning September 15, 2017. An e-mail confirmation that your submission has been received will be sent within two business days.

Note: If you do not receive an email confirmation within two business days of your submission, please contact Megan Laverty atlaverty@tc.edu.

Respondents and Chairs

Members of PES who are interested in serving as session chairs or respondents are invited to contact the Program Chair, Megan Laverty, atlaverty@tc.edu.  Please specify your areas of expertise and provide your full contact information (mailing address, email address, and phone number). For questions concerning the program, please contact Megan Laverty at laverty@tc.edu. We look forward to receiving your submissions.

A note on A/V:

Due to prohibitive costs, PES is unable to provide data projectors, extension cords, or other A/V equipment. Presenters wishing to make use of PowerPoint or other presentation software must make their own arrangements at their own expense.